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2825 Sacramento St
San Francisco, CA, 94115
United States

Food Play

First and foremost, Food Play is fun.

It’s not about something heavy or a hidden meaning. You don’t have to know the discourse of art history.

All that is required? An appetite to smile.

Each original watercolor focuses on a single food item – generally something relatively iconic – and places it front and center in white space. With a moment in the spotlight every cheeseburger, ice cream cone, donut, kale leaf… is immortalized, idealized, and positioned to tell its story.

Handwritten on the back of each piece you’ll find the title – a play on words meant to make you giggle a little – and a few sentences about the history of the subject. Ever wonder about the origins of the Pop Tart? Probably not, but now you might…

 

My technique:

I don’t use anything but Arches watercolor paper.

I begin by sketching the item from a photograph (there is absolutely no way I could have my subjects live in front of me, as they wouldn’t last more than 10 min without being consumed).

I then paint the subject using Prang watercolors (yes, the ones you used in elementary school; they are still my favorite).

 

*Sometimes I’ll erase my pencil lines, but often I think it’s beautiful to leave them, and see the hand-worked process layer by layer. 

First and foremost, Food Play is fun.

It’s not about something heavy or a hidden meaning; you don’t have to know the discourse of art history.

All that is required? An appetite to smile.

Each original watercolor focuses on a single food item – generally something relatively iconic – and places it front and center in white space. With a moment in the spotlight, every cheeseburger, ice cream cone, donut, kale leaf… is immortalized, idealized, and positioned to tell its story. 

Handwritten on the back of each piece you’ll find the title – a play on words meant to make you giggle a little – and several sentences about the history of the subject. Ever wonder about the origins of the Pop-Tart? Probably not, but now you might.

 

My technique:  

I don’t use anything but Arches watercolor paper.

I begin by sketching the item from a photograph (there is absolutely no way I could have my subjects live in front of me, as they wouldn’t last more than 10 minutes without being consumed).

I then paint the subject using Prang watercolors (yes, the ones you used in elementary school; they are still my favorite).

Sometimes I’ll erase my pencil lines, but often I think it’s beautiful to leave them, and see the hand-worked process layer by layer.